Home » Irish Homes and Irish Hearts (1867) by Fanny Taylor
Irish Homes and Irish Hearts (1867) Fanny Taylor

Irish Homes and Irish Hearts (1867)

Fanny Taylor

Published January 28th 2013
ISBN : 9781906359737
Paperback
240 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 Excerpt: ... deadened heart- and Gods specialMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 Excerpt: ... deadened heart- and Gods special benediction rests on them as they pursue their course- for not only are they doing a great work, but they have won a great victory for their country, they have broken down a tremendous barrier, have gained the outposts of the great barren desolate field of workhouse poor, neglected and oppressed. Their example has been already followed in three or four other towns- and may we not hope that the time will come when the workhouses of Ireland shall be in their hands? The Sisters took me into two small wards equally as good as the others, and rather more comfortable on account of their size- these were the Protestant wards. One, I think, had four, the other six, inmates, while the whole number of patients at that moment was over 600. So careful are the guardians that the feelings and consciences of the Protestants shall not be interfered with by their Catholic fellow-patients, that this arrangement has been resorted to. Here the Protestant clergyman can visit them, hold services, &c., whenever he pleases. And this is done in Ireland to a minority of ten among 600, and I thought of certain English workhouses, where the Catholic poor are counted by hundreds, yet where their feelings and their consciences are utterly ignored- where a priest can only enter when he is sent for to an especial case, and may not speak to any other Catholic in the ward- where Catholic visitors are allowed no entrance, and Catholic books are confiscated- where no provision is made for the administration of Catholic services- and I asked myself where was the boasted justice of Englishmen, and when would this disgrace be wiped off from our country. The expenditure of the Limerick infirmary, under the new management, does not exceed that of the precee...