Home » Regional Hindu Gods: Ayyappan, Iravan, Vithoba, Swaminarayan, Khandoba, Murugan, Aiyanar, Muthappan, Kotilingeshwara, Bir Kuar, Sudalai Mad by Source Wikipedia
Regional Hindu Gods: Ayyappan, Iravan, Vithoba, Swaminarayan, Khandoba, Murugan, Aiyanar, Muthappan, Kotilingeshwara, Bir Kuar, Sudalai Mad Source Wikipedia

Regional Hindu Gods: Ayyappan, Iravan, Vithoba, Swaminarayan, Khandoba, Murugan, Aiyanar, Muthappan, Kotilingeshwara, Bir Kuar, Sudalai Mad

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Published August 30th 2011
ISBN : 9781155639888
Paperback
52 pages
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 50. Chapters: Ayyappan, Iravan, Vithoba, Swaminarayan, Khandoba, Murugan, Aiyanar, Muthappan, Kotilingeshwara, BirMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 50. Chapters: Ayyappan, Iravan, Vithoba, Swaminarayan, Khandoba, Murugan, Aiyanar, Muthappan, Kotilingeshwara, Bir Kuar, Sudalai Madan, Shasta, Muneeswarar, Jeevuba, Ravalnath, Thirumal, Jhulelal, Mhasoba, Sannidhanam, Veer Mhaskoba. Excerpt: Iravan (Sanskrit: , ), also known as Iravat (Sanskrit: , ) and Iravant, is a minor character from the Hindu epic of Mahabharata. The son of Pandava prince Arjuna (one of the main heroes of the Mahabharata) and the Naga princess Ulupi, Iravan is the central god of the cult of Kuttantavar-which is also the name commonly given to him in that cult-and plays a major role in the cult of Draupadi. Both these cults are of South Indian origin, from a region of the country where he is worshipped as a village deity and is known as Aravan (Tamil: , Arav ). He is also a patron god of well-known transgender communities called Ali (also Aravani in South India, and Hijra throughout South Asia). The Mahabharata portrays Iravan as dying a heroic death in the 18-day Kurukshetra War (Mahabharata war), the epics main subject. However, the South Indian cults have a supplementary tradition of honouring Aravans self-sacrifice to the goddess Kali to ensure her favour and the victory of the Pandavas in the war. The Kuttantavar cult focuses on one of the three boons granted to Aravan by the god Krishna in honour of this self-sacrifice. Aravan requested that he be married before his death. Krishna satisfied this boon in his female form, Mohini. In Koovagam, Tamil Nadu, this incident is re-enacted in an 18-day festival, first by a ceremonial marriage of Aravan to Alis and male villagers (who have taken vows to Aravan) and then by their widowhood after ritual re-enactment of Aravans sacrifice. The Draupadi cult emphasizes another boon: Krishna allows Aravan to witness the entire duration of the Mahabharata war throug...